Cancer Communication: Uniting Systems through Communication Science
  Monday, August 20, 2012
Dr. Galen Cole, Dr. Barbara Powe, and Dr. Bradford Hesse
Dr. Galen Cole, Associate Director for Communication Science, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Barbara Powe, Director of Cancer Communication Science, American Cancer Society; Dr. Bradford Hesse, Chief of the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute.

Read the Guest Commentary, NCI Cancer Bulletin, March 8, 2011: Reenergizing the Agenda for Cancer Communication

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society are partnering together to apply knowledge gained from the science of cancer communication to the nation’s collective efforts in cancer control.

The Cancer Communication: Uniting Systems Through Communication Science Meeting brought together cancer communication experts to discuss the latest developments and collaborative opportunities in cancer communication research and practice, with the goal of conceptualizing a national agenda for united cancer communication efforts. This event took place on August 20, 2012 in Washington, DC as an ancillary meeting to the 2012 CDC National Cancer Conference.

As work continues on bridging multiple areas of communication science to develop a unified national agenda for cancer control efforts, we would appreciate your feedback on our Cancer Communication National Blueprint and Cancer Communication Systematic Review documents. Download links and contact information are found on the right side of the page. To join the conversation on Twitter, follow @CancerComm2012 and utilize the conference hashtag #cacomm2012 in your tweets.

2012 Agenda, Uniting Systems through Communication Science

Monday, August 20
8:00 – 8:30 a.m.
Registration
Omni Shoreham, Palladian Ballroom
WELCOME AND PROGRAMMATIC OVERVIEW
8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview
Galen Cole, PhD, MPH, LPC Associate Director for Communication Science, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Barbara D. Powe, PhD, RN, Director, Cancer Communication Science, Cancer Control Sciences Department, American Cancer Society (ACS)
8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Partnering Against Cancer Today (PACT): A Blueprint for Participation
Bradford W. Hesse, PhD, Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute (NCI)
9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Panel 1: Uniting Action Around Data
Moderator: Lenora Johnson, PhD, Director, Office of Communication and Education, NCI
  • Cancer communication surveillance: Opportunities using HINTS & BRFSS.
    Kelly Blake, ScD, Program Director, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, NCI
  • Using community health data to improve local outcomes.
    Edward Sondik, PhD, Director, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC
  • Data driven social media campaigns: the metrics and the magic.
    Daniel Davenport, Partner, thinkd2c
  • How to talk about science when the evidence conflicts.
    Durado Brooks, MD, MPH, Director, Prostate and Colorectal Cancers, ACS

Rapporteur: William D. Novelli, MA, Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

10:30 – 11:00 a.m. Facilitated Discussion + Q & A (Panel 1)
11:00 – 11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 – 12:15 p.m. Panel 2: Aligning Forces for Impact
Moderator: Chuck Westbrook, Managing Director of Content, National Home Office, ACS
  • Improving cancer care through Health I.T.
    Farzad Mostashari, MD, ScM, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, DHHS
  • C-Change risk reduction communications campaign.
    Tom Kean, MPH, Executive Director, C-Change: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer
  • Crowd sourcing health promotion materials: Are we ready to give up control?
    Claudia Parvanta, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of the Sciences
  • Communicating cancer information to and through legislative and advocacy efforts – setting priorities and implications.
    David Pugach, JD, Director for Federal Relations, ACS Cancer Action Network

Rapporteur: David K. Ahern, PhD, Director, Health Information Technology Resource Center for Aligning Forces for Quality of RWJF, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School

12:15 – 12:45 p.m. Facilitated Discussion + Q & A (Panel 2)
12:45 – 2:15 p.m. Lunch (on your own)
2:15 – 3:15 p.m. Panel 3: Reinvigorating Cancer Discovery
Moderator: Ann Forsythe, PhD, Associate Director for Communication, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control/Office of the Director, CDC
  • Talking with the public about the importance of science-based medicine.
    Otis Brawley, MD, FACP, Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, Executive Vice President, ACS
  • Using shared decision making to engage patients in cancer research.
  • Michael Wilkes, MD, PhD, Director of Global Health, Professor of Medicine, Internal Medicine, UC Davis, School of Medicine
  • Collaborating to accelerate research.
    Naz Sykes, Executive Director, Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation
  • Energizing new fields of research in cancer communication.
    K. Viswanath, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health

Rapporteur: Thomas J. Glynn, MA, MS, PhD, Director, Cancer Science and Trends, ACS

3:15 – 3:45 p.m. Facilitated Discussion + Q & A (Panel 3)
3:45 – 4:00 p.m. Break
4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Integrative Direction Setting
Moderator: Russ Glasgow, PhD, Deputy Director for Dissemination and Implementation Science, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, NCI
  1. Finding the next questions for communication science to solve
  2. Setting targets for population success against cancer by uniting communication systems
Meeting Documents


Submit a question or comment via email

Background:
This continues to be an extraordinary time for cancer communication research and practice. Systemic changes in the health information environment are making it possible for people to connect to each other and to global resources in ways that were unimagined even 10 years ago. Innovations in social computing, smart phones, ubiquitous data systems, health information technology, and global penetration of the Internet promise to augment capacity in areas of prevention, early detection, diagnosis, coordinated care, and a lifetime of support for cancer survivors. Policy changes such as those embodied in the meaningful use requirements of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009, the Affordable Care Act of 2010, and a push for Accountable Care Organizations are offering powerful new tools to cancer control specialists. New population-based data technologies can offer targets for collective action at the local, state, and national levels. 2011 Cancer Communication Conference: State of the Science and Practice

2012 Meeting Objectives:
At a broader level, the "disruptive changes" that are occurring in the health information environment may be creating a platform for broad – and transparent— participation in cancer control activities that can serve to unify efforts toward greater collective progress. The purpose of this ancillary meeting session will be to leverage components of that platform to create a national agenda for "partnering against cancer today." Specific objectives include the following:

  • Present a national blueprint for cancer communication. In follow-up to a 2011 "state of the science" conference, the CDC, the NCI, and the ACS have worked with leading communication scientists to establish a blueprint to guide cancer communication scientists and practitioners in the years ahead. Science representatives from the three organizations will present a draft of that blueprint to the participants for consideration and input.
  • Unite action around data. Under the White House’s "Open Government" initiative the Department of Health and Human Services is "liberating health data" for broad use in public health and community planning. Presenters will offer tools for tracking cancer control progress at the local, state, and national level using cancer relevant surveys.
  • Aligning forces for system improvement. This year, the DHHS National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has announced the department’s intention to highlight cancer as a special example of how health information technology and policy changes can come together to improve systems of prevention and systems of care in the area of cancer. Attendees will identify mechanisms to tie into these efforts for systems throughout the U.S. states and territories.
  • Reinvigorating Cancer Discovery. Another place where a change in the communication environment has promised to offer significant leverage is in cancer-related research. Whether in the area of translational science, recruitment to clinical trials, or in the broad area of "citizen science," new experiments are emerging to accelerate discovery by using the enhanced capacity of massively parallel research systems.

Meeting Videos

Welcome and Programmatic Overview
Transcript

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player



Video 1
Transcript

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player


Video 2
Transcript

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Video 3
Transcript

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Video 4
Transcript

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player